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Summer Course Offerings

  • SS3391: Methods in Cutural Anthropology - Peg Alden
    Ethnography is an empirical, scientific approach for describing the cultural aspects of human life. This course will investigates the range of research methods used by cultural anthropologists to conduct ethnographic field work, with an emphasis on observation, interviewing, surveying, and the use of archived materials. Although examples from contemporary anthropologists will be used to highlight the methods under study, students will also learn through explicit skills instruction and hands-on practice of research methods. Each student will conduct a community-based, field methods project that allows them to hone their research skills, synthesize their learning and present their findings. Credits: 3

    Course meets M-F 9:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

    (SS1011 Lecture Min Credits: 3.00 Or SS1211 Lecture Min Credits: 3.00 Or SS1311 Lecture Min Credits: 3.00 Or SS1411 Lecture Min Credits: 3.00 Or SS Core Trans Lecture Min Credits: 3.00) And EN1011 Lecture Min Credits: 3.00 And (FY1011 Lecture Min Credits: 3.00 Or FY1001 Lecture Min Credits: 3.00 Or FY1101 Lecture Min Credits: 2.00)

  • HU1011: Western Humanities I - Pre-History through the Middle Ages - Joyce Rodgers
    This course examines the evolution of seminal ideas of enduring significance for Western civilization. Students trace ideas about religion, philosophy, politics, economics, technology and aesthetics from classical Greece through Roman civilization to the Christian and Muslim cultures of the Middle Ages. Students are encouraged to draw parallels between the early forms of these ideas and their expression in current society. Credits: 3 

    Course meets M-F 9:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

  • NS2051: Aquatic Ecology and Water Pollution- Tom Hinckley
    This summer course offers students an opportunity to carry out an in-depth investigation of the ecology and levels of pollution of local rivers and streams. The course weaves together lecture, student presentations, field trips, guest speakers, and laboratory/field investigations. The content emphasis will be on the scientific and environmental issues related to the ecology and pollution of rivers and streams. Students will conduct intensive research on a local watershed, which will result in a presentation of their research findings to members of the Putney community. Lab included. Credits: 4

    Note: this course meets M-F from 9:00 am to 12:00 pm.

    (NS1011 Lecture Min Credits: 4.00 Or NS1021 Lecture Min Credits: 4.00 Or NS1111 Lecture Min Credits: 4.00 Or NS1211 Lecture Min Credits: 4.00 Or NS1311 Lecture Min Credits: 4.00 Or NS1701 Lecture Min Credits: 4.00 Or NS1702 Lecture Min Credits: 4.00 Or NS Core Trans Lecture Min Credits: 4.00) And EN1011 Lecture Min Credits: 3.00 Or (FY1011 Lecture Min Credits: 3.00 Or FY1001 Lecture Min Credits: 3.00 Or FY1101 Lecture Min Credits: 2.00) $35.00

  • CO1011: Introduction to Comunications - Eric Matte
    This survey course introduces students to the field of communication and enables them to increase their effectiveness and precision as public speakers and members of seminars and groups. Students explore how their perceptions influence the manner in which they communicate and how to use a wide variety of listening skills. They become aware of how verbal and nonverbal language can alter, detract from or enhance messages. Students also employ a variety of language strategies that promote inclusion, honesty, conflict resolution and support from within a group. Credits: 3

    Course meets M-F 1:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

  • SS1211: Intro to Sociology - Jim Cabral
    This course introduces students to the scientific study of human social life, groups and societies. Students learn and apply the concepts commonly used by sociologists in framing their understanding of institutions, cultures, networks, organizations, and social relations in general. Students acquire the conceptual tools that enable them to give social context to individual human behavior. Major topics include sociological theory and methods; culture and society; stratification, class and inequality; gender inequality; ethnicity and race; families; education; religion; and political and economic life. In addition, these topics are all presented within the broader context of globalization. Class activities and discussions will regularly be supplemented with short film clips selected from award-winning documentaries. Credits: 3

    Course meets M-F 1:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

  • PE1540: Level 1 Japanese Long Sword
    Slow-paced and emphasizing movement meditation, Japanese Long Sword (Iaido) was developed as an art form to increase participants states of awareness. Japanese Long Sword (Iaido) will introduce students to the basic skills practiced in Iaido: cutting, thrusting, forms, controlling the breath and movement meditation. Classes will include an overview of Iaido skills, followed by an introduction to forms and drills. Students will be assessed on content knowledge and demonstration of skill proficiency throughout the semester. Course may not be repeated. Credits: 1

    Course meets T, TH 6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m. Click Center Gymnasium

  • PE1010 Vinyasa Yoga
    This course supports students interested in exploring mind/body integration and offers an appealing option for balancing academic work with a healthy lifestyle. Conditioning, breathing techniques and self-awareness are covered. Assessment based on a willingness to explore yoga practice through regular attendance and participation. Course may not be repeated. Credits: 1

  • PE1410 Walking for Health
    This course is designed for students who are interested in beginning a low-impact exercise regimen of walking on varied terrain using optimal striding and breathing techniques. Course may not be repeated. Credits: 1


Summer II

  • AT1611: Acting I - Josh Moyse
    A beginning course focusing on the fundamentals of acting, including action, objective, character, physical life, listening, and language. Students will act in exercises, monologues and short scenes that will encourage them to explore the actor's craft. Students will also read plays to begin fostering a knowledge of both scene study and interpretation. Students are expected to rehearse outside of class and to keep an acting journal during the semester. Credits: 3.000 $35.00

    Course meets M-F 9:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m

  • CO2061: Special Topics: Animal and Human Communication and Relationships - Lee Crocker
    This course provides students the opportunity to explore current topics in Communications with a particular focus on Media Studies. Examples of topics may include Media Literacy, Oral History and Media and Human-Animal Communication. The common focus will generally be the controversies and challenges inherent in these topics at this particular time in history. Students will examine these topics critically by studying and researching the philosophical, social, historical, technological, and educational dimensions inherent in these topics. Students will demonstrate their learning through analytical papers and a variety of communication formats: presentation, debate, discussion and dialogue. Credits: 3.000

    CO1011 Lecture Min Credits: 3.00 Or CO1021 Lecture Min Credits: 3.00 Or CO1071 Lecture Min Credits: 3.00 And EN1011 Lecture Min Credits: 3.00 And FY1011 Lecture Min Credits: 3.00 Or FY1001 Lecture Min Credits: 3.00 Or FY1101 Lecture Min Credits: 2.00

    Course meets M-F 9:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m

  • MA1421: Statistics - Frank Klucken
    This course examines frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion, and the normal distribution curve. Students explore confidence intervals and sample size. The structure of hypothesis testing is introduced and applied to a variety of situations. Studies in correlation of data and sampling techniques are introduced. Placement test and/or prerequisite of MA0295 with grade of C- or higher required. Not open to students with credit in MA 2621. Credits: 3.000

    Course meets M-F 9:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m

  • NS1021: Introduction to Biology: Organisms and Enviroment - Kim Coleman
    This course examines the key concepts of modern biology with an emphasis on the relationships between organisms and their environment. Studies of evolution and genetics are woven in to this theme and provide students with additional perspectives on the biological world. Lab included. Credits: 4.000
    $35.00 MATH Placement Test 3.0000

    Note: Course meets M-F 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m

  • HU3411: Religion and Popular Culture - Dan Miller
    This course examines some of the complex ways in which religion and popular culture interact and explores the possible significance of those interactions. Students will examine the intersection of religion and popular culture by considering a range of popular media (e.g., the internet, movies, television, music) and topics (e.g., current events, advertising, self-help spirituality, and sports and recreation). Students must have completed three courses at the 2000 level, with grades of C or higher, as prerequisites for this course. Credits: 3.000
    EN1021 Lecture Min Credits: 3.00

    Course meets M-F 1:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m

  • EN2051: Film Adaptations of Literature - Susan Austin
    Film Adaptations of Literature explores the ways that two distinct media play with the same ideas. In this course, we'll discuss the foundations of the two media, their similarities, differences and shortcomings, in order to understand and appreciate the choices each artist made for the medium. We will work within the disciplines of literature and filmmaking, in order to develop our expertise in the fields of film and literary criticism. Class work will include extensive reading and film viewing, discussion and analytic writing assignments. Credits: 3.000
    EN1021 Lecture Min Credits: 3.00 And (FY1011 Lecture Min Credits: 3.00 Or FY 1001 Lecture Min Credits: 3.00 Or FY1101 Lecture Min Credits: 2.00)

    Course meets M-F 1:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m

  • PE1540: Level 1 Japanese Long Sword
    Slow-paced and emphasizing movement meditation, Japanese Long Sword (Iaido) was developed as an art form to increase participants states of awareness. Japanese Long Sword (Iaido) will introduce students to the basic skills practiced in Iaido: cutting, thrusting, forms, controlling the breath and movement meditation. Classes will include an overview of Iaido skills, followed by an introduction to forms and drills. Students will be assessed on content knowledge and demonstration of skill proficiency throughout the semester. Course may not be repeated. Credits: 1

    Course meets T, TH 6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m. Click Center Gymnasium

  • PE1590: Gentle Flow Yoga will introduce students basic yoga poses, body alignment, attention to breathing and mindfulness. Students will be encouraged to challenge their flexibility in mostly seated positions and will be guided through exercises to facilitate a connection between the body and breath. Gentle Flow Yoga deemphasizes the push-ups (chaturanga) commonly found in Vinyasa Yoga and instead focuses on range of motion in the hips, balance and flow. Students will be assessed on content knowledge and demonstration of skill proficiency throughout the semester. Course may not be repeated. Credits: 1.000

    Course meets MW 4:15 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. in the Fine Arts Building, Room 323

  • PE1130: This course will use on- and off-campus trails to teach students skills related to hiking. Course may not be repeated. Credits: 1.000

    Course meets M 4:30 - 7:00 p.m. (one day per week, twice as long) Click Center Gymnasium, Room Lobby

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