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Summer Course Offerings 2020

Language and Culture: ANT2012 | Credits 3.00

This course combines language self-study with online intercultural exchange to allow students to explore the intersections of language and culture. Each student will choose a language of interest, and a country where that language is spoken. Using language learning apps and online resources, and with guidance from the instructor, students will study that language and culture, and will engage in language and intercultural exchange with a native speaker. Guided reflection will aid students as they navigate intercultural interactions online. Readings and discussions will explore topics such as stereotypes, cultural identity, visible and invisible aspects of culture, and how culture can influence (or inhibit) communication. Students can choose to continue learning a language they have previously studied, or begin a new language.
Prerequisites: 1000-level Social Science course
Notes: This course fulfills the Alternative Study requirement for BA/BS majors.
Instructor: Lindoerfer, Jessica
Duration: 6/8/20 – 7/10/20 | 1:30 – 4 p.m.

Special Topics: Career Development: EDU2031 | Credits 3.00

In this career development course, students will engage in instruction that supports an in-depth understanding of their interests, values, skills, strengths, and areas of challenge as they consider future career options. They will reflect upon current trends in career development and understand more about who they are, why work is important to them, and what kind of work might be the most natural fit for them. Students will explore theories related to career development, and they will be encouraged to consider ways in which they might maximize their strengths to meet the demands of specific work and/or classroom environments. A variety of inventories will be administered to facilitate career exploration, and panels, field trips, and/or presentations will be used to enhance students’ understanding of the strengths and skills required of employees working in a variety of professions. Students will receive support with creating linked-in accounts, networking strategies, and making connections with Landmark College Alums. Finally, students will conduct in-depth research related to careers of interest and construct a career development plan at the end of the course.
Prerequisites: WRT 1011, EDU 1011, COM 1011
Notes: Recommended for recent graduates or students two semester away from completing their degrees.
Instructor: Stamp, Lucy
Duration: 6/8/20 – 7/10/20 | 9 – 11:30 a.m.

Special Topics: Leadership and Facilitation: COM3031 | Credits 3.00

Students taking Leadership & Facilitation will explore the principles of leadership and develop interpersonal and group leadership skills to impact their lives and their communities. Students will practice applying leadership skills in various activities such as group building, community service, and in-depth case studies. Content areas include leadership vs leader, goal setting, effective communication, organization and time management skills, and different styles of leadership. Students will interview the leaders of organizations and observe the work at that institution. In addition, students will assess the leadership style of leaders of the case studies. As a culminating project, students will analyze a case-study of leadership and team-based communication and synthesize concepts from the course. Students must have completed three courses at the 2000 level, with grades of C or higher, as prerequisites for this course. Students who already have credit in COM3031 Leadership & Small Group Communication may not earn credit for this course.
Prerequisites: WRT 1012
Notes: This course can serve as elective for any major. For the COMEL major, this is a required course.
Instructor: Crocker, Lee
Duration: 6/8/20 – 7/10/20 | 9 – 11:30 a.m.

Diversity Psychology: PSY3061 | Credits 3.00

This course explores the psychology of diversity and provides instruction for thinking and writing in the field. With an emphasis on diversity in the United States, students will study foundational concepts in multicultural psychology. Topics include worldview, privilege and oppression, in-group/out-group dynamics, immigration psychology, stereotyping and prejudice, and multicultural competence. Using this knowledge, students will critically analyze elements of popular culture as well as the field of psychology. Emphasis will be on the experiences and perspectives of groups that may be left out of mainstream discourse. These include racial and ethnic minorities, sexual identity minorities, religious minorities, persons with lower socioeconomic status, and persons with neurodiversity that may manifest as a disability. Students will be asked to read an interdisciplinary selection of books and articles, take reading quizzes, facilitate a hands-on workshop, write blogs, and write an academic literature review.
Prerequisites: One 1000-level Social Science course and three 2000-level courses with a grade of C or above
Notes: This course can serve as an elective in any major. For PSY majors, it can fulfill a requirement at the upper division level.
Instructor: Beck, Tim
Duration: 6/8/20 – 7/10/20 | 1:30 – 4 p.m.

Two-Dimensional Design: ART1211 | Credits 3.00

This introductory, hands-on studio course explores the materials and conceptual processes involved in the organization of matter and space. The parallel objectives of the course are the creation of compelling and poetic three-dimensional objects and the development of each student’s powers of observation, evaluation, and expression. Through an integrated series of problem-solving assignments, instructions, technical demonstrations, and discussions, students will explore the unique physical potential and limitations of various materials including clay, wire, paper, wood, and found objects. Students will produce a portfolio of projects and exhibit work in the student art show. Lab fee / materials fee applied to this course.
Prerequisites: None
Notes: This course is required for the BASA major. It can be taken as an elective by students in any major.
Instructor: Parker, Derek
Duration: 7/13/20 – 8/14/20 | 9 – 11:30 a.m.

Employment Readiness Experience (ERE): BUS1100 | Credits 1.00

This is an introductory course to accompany the ERE, providing education and exposure to professional skills needed to acquire and maintain employment. The course will focus on having students understand what professional skills are and how they can be developed and implemented in the workplace, while also giving students an opportunity to explore their career values, articulate current work experiences for future employment, and carry out future job searches independently. By the end of the course, students will be able to identify and demonstrate the essential career competencies of communication, problem solving, teamwork, and professionalism. Students will engage in independent reflection, case studies, group activities, and discussions to learn course material, and will actively apply new skills learned in the classroom to their concurrent employment experience. Assessment will be based on class participation and a final presentation of the employment experience. As part of the ERE program, students will also engage in a ‘skills lab’ following class to work on putting new skills into practice and address specific tasks that are part of their campus employment with a career counselor.
Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Employment Readiness Experience
Notes: This is a 4 week course
Instructor: Landin, Jeanette
Duration: 7/13/20 – 8/14/20 | TBD

Personal Finance: FIN1011 | Credits 3.00

This course provides students with a foundation upon which to develop lifelong personal financial management skills. Topics include: the importance of personal finance; financial planning and the time-value of money; money management skills such as budgeting, balancing a checkbook, taxes, cash management, credit/debit cards, and major purchases (auto, home, education); insurance (property/liability, health, life); and investments (stocks, bonds, mutual funds, portfolio management, real estate, retirement planning).
Prerequisite: Math placement minimal level 3.00 or Successfully completed of Algebra with minimal grade of B or successful completion of a higher level course in the algebra sequence and a letter of reference from math professor/teacher.
Notes: This course can fulfill the Quantitative Reasoning requirement for students in all majors
Instructor: Koskorios, Jim
Duration: 7/13/20 – 8/14/20 | 9 – 11:30 a.m.

Special Topics: The Science of Wellness: HTH1011 | Credits 4.00

This course explores current best evidence about health and wellness issues relevant to the college student. Students will be introduced to health education content specifically confronting college-age adults, including physical activity, sleep, diet, and mental wellbeing. Using scientific thinking and information literacy, students will collect and analyze data and practice scientific writing. This course focuses on the relationship between lifestyle choices and the learning process by asking students to reflect on how their personal choices can affect their academic achievement. Students will explore course themes through assigned readings, discussion and lab activities.
Prerequisites: None
Notes: This course fulfills the Science requirement or Quantitative Reasoning requirement for any major. This course can be taken as an elective by students who have already fulfilled their general education requirements.
Instructor: Miller, Todd
Duration: 7/13/20 – 8/14/20 | 1 – 4 p.m.

Film Adaptations of Literature: LIT2011 | Credits 3.00

Film Adaptations of Literature explores the ways that two distinct media play with the same ideas. In this course, we’ll discuss the foundations of the two media, the similarities, differences, and shortcomings in order to understand and appreciate the choices each artist made for the medium. We will work within the disciplines of literature and filmmaking in order to develop our expertise in the fields of film and literary criticism. Class work will include extensive reading and film viewing, discussion, and analytic writing assignments.
Prerequisites: WRT 1012 with a grade of C or higher
Notes: This course fulfills the 2000-level literature requirement for the AA in Liberal Studies, the BA in Liberal Studies, and the BA in Studio Arts. It can be taken as elective for students in other majors.
Instructor: Austin, Susan
Duration: 7/13/20 – 8/14/20 | 1:30 – 4 p.m.

Special Topics: Crisis Communication:: COM3076 | Credits 3.00

Media reports and our perceptions of crises are often are at odds with the real events that people experience. From global warming to the recent COVID-19 pandemic, our current condition is increasingly defined by worldwide crises. This course will explore the ways our perceptions of global crises are shaped and informed by the media, including broadcast, print, film, and digital. Through reviews of case studies, students will evaluate how media have informed civic responses to crises over time. They will examine the AIDS epidemic, 9/11, the war on terror, the 2008 financial crisis, and the opioid crisis. Discussions will focus on promoting media and information literacy, as well as strength and resiliency in times of crisis. These activities and presentations will draw from positive psychology, communication, sociology, economics, health, environmental science, and statistics. Students will be assigned films, documentaries and podcasts about crises that promote “apocalyptic imagination,” (Mad Max, Water World, and Outbreak). Students will become critical consumers, increase media literacy, understand the various impacts of media, and gain valuable research skills.
Prerequisites: WRT 1012
Notes: This course is an elective for any major
Instructor: Gyuri, Kepes
Duration: 7/13/20 – 8/14/20 | 1:30 – 4 p.m.

Special Topics: Exploring the lived experience of adversity & resilience: PSY3023 | Credits 3.00

Through participation in a hands-on interview project, students will explore resilience, adaptation, and related psychology concepts to construct accounts of how people experience adversity. With the COVID-19 pandemic affecting populations across the globe, this course will give students the opportunity to learn about the lived experience of others using virtual communication tools. The course will start with an overview and current examples of psychological concepts about the human ability to adapt to stress including resilience, coping, reframing, social connection, and finding purpose. With this background, students will create and conduct a qualitative interviewing project focused on navigating and making meaning from real world challenges. Students will be expected to attend synchronous online course sessions, read assigned short articles, take quizzes, and design and conduct an interviewing project.
Prerequisites: PSY 1011 with a C or higher grade OR 2000-level PSY with a C or higher grade
Notes: This course can serve as an upper division Individual and Society course for the PSY major. It can serve as an elective for any major and fulfills the Alternative Study requirement.
Instructor: Shmulsky, Solvegi
Duration: 7/13/20 – 8/14/20 | 9 – 11:30 a.m.

Gentle Flow Yoga: PHE1132 | Credits 1.00

Gentle Flow Yoga will introduce students basic yoga poses, body alignment, attention to breathing and mindfulness. Students will be encouraged to challenge their flexibility in mostly seated positions and will be guided through exercises to facilitate a connection between the body and breath. Gentle Flow Yoga deemphasizes the push-ups (chaturanga) commonly found in Vinyasa Yoga and instead focuses on range of motion in the hips, balance and flow. Students will be assessed on content knowledge and demonstration of skill proficiency throughout the semester. Course may not be repeated.
Prerequisites: None
Instructor: Cassidy, Kristin
Duration: 7/13/20 – 8/14/20 | TTH 4:15 – 5:45 p.m.

Hiking: PHE1165 | Credits 1.00

This course will use on- and off-campus trails to teach students skills related to cross country skiing and/or hiking. Course may not be repeated.
Prerequisites: None
Instructor: TBD
Duration: 7/13/20 – 8/14/20 | MW 4:15 – 5:45 p.m.

Introduction to Communication: COM1011 | Credits 3.00

This survey course introduces students to the field of communication and enables them to increase their effectiveness and precision as public speakers and members of seminars and groups. Students explore how their perceptions influence the manner in which they communicate and how to use a wide variety of listening skills. They become aware of how verbal and nonverbal language can alter, detract from or enhance messages. Students also employ a variety of language strategies that promote inclusion, honesty, conflict resolution and support from within a group.
Prerequisites: None
Instructor: Matte, Eric
Duration: 6/8/20 – 8/14/20

Personal Finance: FIN1011 | Credits 3.00

This course provides students with a foundation upon which to develop lifelong personal financial management skills. Topics include: the importance of personal finance; financial planning and the time-value of money; money management skills such as budgeting, balancing a checkbook, taxes, cash management, credit/debit cards, and major purchases (auto, home, education); insurance (property/liability, health, life); and investments (stocks, bonds, mutual funds, portfolio management, real estate, retirement planning).
Prerequisites: Math placement minimal level 3.00 or successfully completed of Algebra with a minimum grade of B or successful completion of a higher level course in the algebra sequence and a letter of reference from math professor/teacher.
Instructor: Landin, Jeanette
Duration: 6/8/20 – 8/14/20

Statistics: MAT1321 | Credits 3.00

This course examines frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion, and the normal distribution curve. Students explore confidence intervals and sample size. The structure of hypothesis testing is introduced and applied to a variety of situations. Studies in correlation of data and sampling techniques are introduced. Placement test and/or prerequisite of MAT0291 with grade of C- or higher required. Not open to students with credit in MAT2621. This course is offered every fall and spring semester.
Prerequisites: Math placement minimal level 3.00 or MAT0291/Lecture minimal grade of C- or successfully completed Algebra with minimal grade of B or successful completion of a higher level course in the algebra sequence and a letter of reference from math professor/teacher.
Computer Requirements: Laptop, or desktop with a webcam. A webcam is a video camera that feeds or streams images and video in real time to other active users. You will need to use a webcam to hold video conferences with your instructor. If you use a desktop, make sure you have a webcam. You can purchase a webcam from several online retailers. Full-time Landmark College students are required to purchase the Lenovo Yoga computer package, which comes with a webcam.
Software Requirements: Fathom, which is available for download at https://fathom.concord.org/ ($5.25 for one year). During the first week of classes, schedule a conference with your instructor to learn how to download and use Fathom. Use the Calendar to schedule an appointment.
System Requirements: Fathom will not function on macOS 10.15 or above. Fathom runs on Windows and macOS versions 10.6 through 10.14. Full-time Landmark College students are required to purchase the Lenovo Yoga computer package and should already have access to Windows.
Instructor: Rosenberg, Gil
Duration: 6/8/20 – 8/14/20

Introduction to Psychology: PSY1011 | Credits 3.00

This course introduces students to the fields of study in modern psychology. After this course, students will be able to answer the following questions: What is psychology? What are the methods of investigation in psychology? How is the science of psychology applied to individuals and groups? This course surveys a broad range of content including topics such as learning, cognition, memory, emotion, perception, personality, developmental psychology, stress & health, psychological disorders, and the biological underpinnings of behavior.
Prerequisites: None
Instructor: Ross, David
Duration: 6/8/20 – 8/14/20

Composition and Rhetoric: WRT1011 | Credits 3.00

This course emphasizes the interconnected nature of writing and reading at the college level. Students develop and refine individualized writing and critical reading processes while working with a variety of rhetorical strategies and structures. Students are asked to express their ideas and integrate material from texts through participating in class discussions, completing informal assignments, and writing academic papers of increasing length and complexity.
Prerequisites: None
Instructor: Baronian, Meg
Duration: 6/8/20 – 8/14/20

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