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Summer Course Offerings 2019

  • BUS3031 — Special Topics: Opportunity Management | Credits 3.00

    This course provides opportunities to apply innovation and project management skills such as goal setting, problem solving, product/service development, team building, and leadership. Students will study entrepreneurship principles and, in groups, partner with local entrepreneurs toward solving real world business challenges. Students will assist in project work that involves multiple steps and many variables, said by some as “herding cats.” Topics include market research, promotion and PR, client relations, production practices, and new product development/implementation. Students will gain real world personal experience and, in the process, give back to the local business community. Students must have completed three courses at the 2000 level, with grades of C or higher, as prerequisites for this course. BUS2021 Entrepreneurship and Innovation is recommended as a prerequisite, but not required.

    Registration Type Traditional
    Fees N/A
    Instructors Stenn, Tamara
    Duration 6/3/2019–7/5/2019
    Schedule MTWTHF 9–11:30 a.m.; Landmark College, East Academic Building, Room 004
    Prerequisites WRT1012/Lecture (min. credit = 3.00)
    Corequisites N/A
    Credit Types Credit Non-Credit

  • ECO2511 — Aquatic Ecology and Pollution | Credits 4.00

    This summer course offers students an opportunity to carry out an in-depth investigation of the ecology and levels of pollution of local rivers and streams. The course weaves together lecture, student presentations, field trips, guest speakers, and laboratory/field investigations. The content emphasis will be on the scientific and environmental issues related to the ecology and pollution of rivers and streams. Students will conduct intensive research on a local watershed, which will result in a presentation of their research findings to members of the Putney community. Lab included.

    Registration Type Traditional
    Fees Course Lab Fee $35.00 (Fee Group All)
    Instructors Hinckley, Thomas R.
    Duration 6/3/2019–7/5/2019
    Schedule MTWTHF 9 a.m.–Noon; Landmark College, Stem Center, Room 227
    Prerequisites WRT1011/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> and (EDU1011/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> or EDU1001/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> or EDU1201/Lecture <min credit = 2.00>) and (BIO1511/Lecture <min credit = 4.00> or BIO1521/Lecture <min credit = 4.00> or BIO1522/Lecture <min credit = 4.00> or CHE1511/Lecture <min credit = 4.00> or CHE1521/Lecture <min credit = 4.00> or CHE1522/Lecture <min credit = 4.00> or GEO1511/Lecture <min credit = 4.00> or NSC1511/Lecture <min credit = 4.00> or NSC1000/Lecture <min credit = 4.00> or NSC1001/Lecture <min credit = 4.00>) or Instructor Permission Required from Registrar
    Corequisites N/A
    Credit Types Credit Non-Credit

    Credit Types: Credit Non-Credit
  • COM1011 — Introduction to Communication | Credits 3.00

    This survey course introduces students to the field of communication and enables them to increase their effectiveness and precision as public speakers and members of seminars and groups. Students explore how their perceptions influence the manner in which they communicate and how to use a wide variety of listening skills. They become aware of how verbal and nonverbal language can alter, detract from or enhance messages. Students also employ a variety of language strategies that promote inclusion, honesty, conflict resolution and support from within a group.

    Registration Type Traditional
    Fees N/A
    Instructors Burns, Elizabeth
    Duration 6/3/2019–7/5/2019
    Schedule MTWTHF 1:30–4 p.m.; Landmark College, East Academic Building, Room 006
    Prerequisites None
    Corequisites N/A
    Credit Types Credit Non Credit

  • LIT2017 — Science Fiction | Credits 3.00

    This course, through a survey of twentieth-century science fiction literature and film, seeks to foster a deeper understanding of and appreciation for the genre. Using analysis of science fiction literature and an examination of social and historical contexts, students will develop critical and creative responses to such themes as artificial life, science and politics, utopias and dystopias, the flexibility of time and encounters with other worlds.

    Registration Type Traditional
    Fees N/A
    Instructors Kipp, John G.
    Duration 6/3/2019–7/5/2019
    Schedule MTWTHF 9–11:30 a.m.; Landmark College, East Academic Building, Room 203
    Prerequisites WRT1012/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> and (EDU1011/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> or EDU1001/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> or EDU1201/Lecture <min credit = 2.00>) or Instructor Permission Required from Registrar
    Corequisites N/A
    Credit Types Credit Non-Credit

  • WRT1012 — Research and Analysis | Credits 3.00

    Information literacy skills will drive the scope and sequence of this second semester course, which builds on the critical reading, writing and thinking skills introduced in WRT1011 and EDU1011. Through a variety of active learning techniques, instructional library sessions, class discussion and research writing projects, students will learn the skills and strategies required for the volume reading, critical analysis, synthesis, and academic writing demands of the college curriculum.

    Registration Type Traditional
    Fees N/A
    Instructors Austin, Susan
    Duration 6/3/2019–7/5/2019
    Schedule MTWTHF 1:30–4 p.m.; Landmark College, East Academic Building, Room 202
    Prerequisites WRT1011/Lecture <min grade = C-, min credit = 3.00> or Instructor Permission Required from Registrar
    Corequisites N/A
    Credit Types Credit Non-Credit

  • BIO1511 — Introduction to Biology | Credits 4.00

    This course aims to deepen the scientific and biological literacy of students not majoring in Life Science. In contrast to traditional, vocabulary-dense biology courses, this course will offer students the opportunity for a more personally relevant biology experience focused on applying scientific inquiry to current biological issues. The process of how scientists study the biological world and biological evolution provides the thematic foundation for the course. Topics and themes addressed will be drawn from nutrition, health and disease; genetics and biotechnology; and ecology and environmental studies. Primary learning modes include lecture, discussion, presentations, case studies, laboratory investigations and field trips. Students will be expected to demonstrate their understanding of the course content through a variety of written and oral assessments.

    Registration Type Traditional
    Fees Course Lab Fee $35.00 (Fee Group All)
    Instructors Miller, Todd R
    Duration 7/8/2019–8/9/2019
    Schedule MTWTHF  1:30–4:30 p.m.; Landmark College, Room
    Prerequisites N/A
    Corequisites N/A
    Credit Types Credit Non-Credit

  • CER2011 — Ceramics I | Credits 3.00

    This course will ground students in the fundamentals of ceramics and introduce them to clay techniques, tools, materials, and visual language as experienced through hand building and wheel throwing. Students will explore several significant genres such as Japanese ceramics, Bennington potters, pottery of the Southwest, as well as contemporary artists working in the medium. Students will also take advantage of the rich resource of potters in Windham County by visiting other studios and hearing guest lectures from established potters. Students will develop individual goals in formal and non-traditional approaches with guidance from the instructors. A major component of the course is for students to take responsible ownership of the studio space, expressed through student commitment to work independently, to honor all safety procedures, and to keep the space in good condition.

    Registration Type Traditional
    Fees Course Lab Fee $35.00 (Fee Group All)
    Instructors Parker, Derek
    Duration 7/8/2019–8/9/2019
    Schedule MTWTHF  9–11:30 a.m.; Landmark College, Room
    Prerequisites N/A
    Corequisites N/A
    Credit Types Credit Non-Credit

  • LIT2011 — Film Adaptations of Literature | Credits 3.00

    Film Adaptations of Literature explores the ways that two distinct media play with the same ideas. In this course, we'll discuss the foundations of the two media, their similarities, differences and shortcomings, in order to understand and appreciate the choices each artist made for the medium. We will work within the disciplines of literature and filmmaking, in order to develop our expertise in the fields of film and literary criticism. Class work will include extensive reading and film viewing, discussion and analytic writing assignments.

    Registration Type Traditional
    Fees N/A
    Instructors Austin, Susan
    Duration 7/8/2019–8/9/2019
    Schedule MTWTHF 1:30–4 p.m.; Landmark College, Room
    Prerequisites WRT1012/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> and (EDU1011/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> or EDU1001/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> or EDU1201/Lecture <min credit = 2.00>) or Instructor Permission Required from Registrar
    Corequisites N/A
    Credit Types Credit Non-Credit 

  • PSY1011 — Introduction to Psychology | Credits 3.00

    This course introduces students to the fields of study in modern psychology. After this course, students will be able to answer the following questions: What is psychology? What are the methods of investigation in psychology? How is the science of psychology applied to individuals and groups? This course surveys a broad range of content including topics such as learning, cognition, memory, emotion, perception, personality, developmental psychology, stress & health, psychological disorders, and the biological underpinnings of behavior.

    Registration Type Traditional
    Fees N/A
    Instructors Beck, Timothy
    Duration 7/8/2019–8/9/2019
    Schedule MTWTHF 9:00–11:30 p.m.; Landmark College, Location TBD
    Prerequisites None
    Corequisites N/A
    Credit Types Credit Non-Credit 

  • LIT3036 — ST: Keats to Kendrick:Prosody Poetry Song | Credits 3.00

    The English language has gone through many transitions since the Old English period. Still, fundamental aspects of prosody (rhythm, stress, and intonation) have persisted, and are evident in the underlying structures of contemporary music genres such as folk, the blues, and hip-hop. Students will study classic examples of traditional forms — the Old English alliterative line, the ballad, the sonnet, and lyric forms from the 17th century, as well as the poetry of the 19th century. They will apply this analysis to a critical examination of musical forms that became popular in the 20th century, in order to discern underlying patterns and examine cultural factors that shaped the evolution of the American lyric. Students will complete two major critical essays, practice writing in the forms they study, and demonstrate basic understanding of prosody as well as the cultural influences that have shaped the modern lyric. Students must have completed three courses at the 2000 level, one of which is a 2000 level literature course, with grades of C or higher, as prerequisites for this course.

    Registration Type Traditional
    Fees N/A
    Instructors Gander, MacLean
    Duration 7/8/2019–8/9/2019
    Schedule MTWTHF 9–11:30 a.m.; Landmark College, Room
    Prerequisites WRT1012/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> and (LIT2011/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> or LIT2012/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> or LIT2013/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> or LIT2014/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> or LIT2015/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> or Instructor Permission Required from Cox, Lindsay A or LIT2018/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> or LIT2019/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> or LIT2021/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> or LIT2022/Lecture <min credit = 3.00>) or Instructor Permission Required from Registrar
    Corequisites N/A
    Credit Types Credit Non-Credit

  • MAT1321 — Statistics | Credits 3.00

    This course examines frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion, and the normal distribution curve. Students explore confidence intervals and sample size. The structure of hypothesis testing is introduced and applied to a variety of situations. Studies in correlation of data and sampling techniques are introduced. Placement test and/or prerequisite of MAT0291 with grade of C- or higher required. Not open to students with credit in MAT2621. This course is offered every fall and spring semester.

    Registration Type Traditional
    Fees N/A
    Instructors Rosenberg, Gil
    Duration 7/8/2019–8/9/2019
    Schedule MTWTHF 9–11:30 a.m.; Landmark College, Room
    Prerequisites MATH/Placement Test <3.00> or MAT0291/Lecture <min grade = C-> or Instructor Permission Required from Registrar
    Corequisites N/A
    Credit Types Credit Non-Credit

  • REL2061 — ST: Believing and Unbelieving: New England Religion, Spirituality, and Unbelief | Credits 3.00

    This course examines the history and changing dynamics of American religion, spirituality, and non-religion, with a specific focus on New England and the region around Putney, VT. The course considers the historical development of diverse religious and spiritual traditions in the region, including contemporary developments and changing social dynamics, such as the significant rise of the religiously unaffiliated (the so-called “nones”), new religious movements, those who identify as “spiritual but not religious,” etc. A distinctive feature of the course will be visits to religious, spiritual, and related institutions and sites within the region, together with interviews and dialogue with practitioners and leaders of those institutions, to gain an understanding of the lived experience and practice of these movements within the region at present.

    Registration Type Traditional
    Fees N/A
    Instructors Miller, Daniel
    Duration 7/8/2019–8/9/2019
    Schedule MTWTHF 1:30–4 p.m.; Landmark College, Room
    Prerequisites WRT1011/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> and (EDU1011/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> or EDU1001/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> or EDU1201/Lecture <min credit = 2.00>) and (HIS1011/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> or HIS1012/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> or HIS1021/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> or HIS1022/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> or HIS1031/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> or HIS1032/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> or HIS1000/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> or PHI1011/Lecture <min credit = 3.00> or REL1011/Lecture <min credit = 3.00>) or Instructor Permission Required from Registrar
    Corequisites N/A
    Credit Types Credit Non-Credit

  • PHE1131 — Vinyasa Yoga | Credits 1.00

    This course supports students interested in exploring mind/body integration and offers an appealing option for balancing academic work with a healthy lifestyle. Conditioning, breathing techniques and self-awareness are covered. Assessment based on a willingness to explore yoga practice through regular attendance and participation. Course may not be repeated.

    Registration Type Traditional
    Fees N/A
    Instructors Cassidy, Kristin
    Duration 7/8/2019–8/9/2019
    Schedule MW 4:15–5:45 p.m.; Landmark College, Room
    Prerequisites N/A
    Corequisites N/A
    Credit Types Credit

  • PHE1137 — Beginner T'ai Chi Chuan | Credits 1.00

    Students will learn the 24 Form style of T'ai Chi. The goal of the class is to help students focus on their own inner activity, develop a greater sense of being centered in the world, and to discover a system that promotes overall health. Students must be willing to participate in a slow moving, silent, meditative practice. Course may not be repeated.

    Registration Type Traditional
    Fees N/A
    Instructors TBD
    Duration 7/8/2019–8/9/2019
    Schedule TTH 5:45–7 p.m.; Landmark College, Room
    Prerequisites N/A
    Corequisites N/A
    Credit Types Credit

  • PHE1138 — Advanced T'ai Chi Chuan | Credits 1.00

    In Advanced T’ai Chi Chuan, students will be introduced to advanced forms practiced in T’ai Chi Chuan. The goal of the class is to help students focus on their inner mental activity, develop a greater sense of being centered in their environment, and to develop an appreciation of physical and mental well-being. Students must be willing to participate in a slow moving, silent, meditative practice. Classes will begin with an overview of advanced T'ai Chi skills, followed by a review of forms. Students will be assessed on content knowledge and demonstration of skill proficiency throughout the semester. Course may not be repeated.

    Registration Type Traditional
    Fees N/A
    Instructors TBD
    Duration 7/8/2019–8/9/2019
    Schedule MW 5:45–7 p.m.; Landmark College, Room
    Prerequisites PHE1137/Sports <min credit = 1.00>
    Corequisites N/A
    Credit Types Credit

  • PHE1165 — Hiking | Credits 1.00

    This course will use on- and off-campus trails to teach students skills related to hiking. Course may not be repeated.

    Registration Type Traditional
    Fees N/A
    Instructors TBD
    Duration 7/8/2019–8/9/2019
    Schedule MW 4:15–5:45 p.m.; Landmark College, Room
    Prerequisites N/A
    Corequisites N/A
    Credit Types Credit

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