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Summer Session for Visiting College Students

36 days to a new way of learning!

APPLY ONLINE TODAY! Create an account and then submit an application.

Sunday, July 8 – Saturday August 11, 2018 (Last day of class is Friday, August 10)
Cost: $7,750, plus $125 refundable damage deposit (cost includes double occupancy residence hall room, all meals, and most activities)
Optional, 1-credit physical education courses are offered at an additional cost.

Are you a bright and talented college student with a learning disability, ADHD, or ASD? Do you study and work hard—but your grades do not show it? Do you find yourself falling further and further behind?

The Summer Session for Visiting College Students features morning and afternoon classes, along with plenty of opportunities for fun activities, sports, recreation, and exploration of Vermont’s beautiful countryside. You will immerse yourself in an entirely new living and learning experience, joining a college community unlike any other you have ever experienced:

  • Study with other bright and talented students who also learn differently—students from a variety of colleges and universities around the country, as well as Landmark College’s own students, who will share their experiences and learning strategies as fellow classmates in credit courses.
  • Learn from professors who truly understand the challenges and frustrations you encounter in the classroom—and who can help you discover new learning strategies to succeed.
  • Gain an in-depth understanding of your learning differences and personal learning style.
  • Learn to advocate for your needs as a learner.
  • Build your comprehension, writing, and executive function skills so you can return to school next fall with the skills you need to succeed.

Create an account and apply online here using the Landmark College Application.

If you would like to receive further information, please provide your contact information.

Financial Aid

Financial aid is available for the Summer Session for Visiting College Students and eligibility is based primarily on financial need. Students must be accepted to the program before receiving an award. Financial aid applications are reviewed on a first-come, first-served basis.

What You Gain From a Summer at Landmark College

Our years of experience with students who learn differently have shown that focusing, even for a short time, on how you learn can make a significant difference in your success in school.

We expect you to:

  • Gain an in-depth understanding of your learning differences and personal learning style
  • Advocate for your needs as a learner
  • Build learning strategies in the academic areas most difficult for you
  • Develop study skills that produce results
  • Develop skills in emerging assistive technology to advance your learning abilities
  • Learn to use the support and expertise of kind and caring professors and advisors
  • Identify ways to become more strategic in your approach to college

Faculty Support

In addition to your classes, you’ll also participate in:

  • Weekly small-group advising sessions with Landmark College faculty advisors to collaborate on identifying and using resources of time management, organization, and work completion
  • One-on-one meetings with your faculty advisor to work on your areas of need
  • Visits to the College’s Center for Academic Support, a real hub in the learning process at Landmark. Staffed by College faculty, it offers support in reading, writing, study skills, and coursework
  • Support from our experienced librarians and assistive and educational technology staff

Summer in Putney, Vermont

The Summer Session for Visiting College Students is offered on Landmark College’s rural campus in picturesque southern Vermont. The town of Putney is located just nine miles from historic Brattleboro, named one of the “Top 10 Small Art Towns in America.” Participants join current Landmark College students who will be taking college courses. Program staff are primarily members of the Landmark College faculty.

Download the 2017 Brochure for more information. The 2018 Brochure will be available in February.

Bridge Semester

Landmark College also offers a fall or spring Bridge Semester for visiting students. Spending a semester at Landmark College gives students a boost to their learning strategies, skills, and self-knowledge, acting as a bridge to success when they return to their home college or transfer to another institution.

 

QUESTIONS?
Contact Landmark College’s Office of Admissions
Telephone: 802-387-6718
E-mail: admissions@landmark.edu

Track A—Developmental Track

Students electing Track A will take the required, Perspectives in Learning course, which is required for all first year students, and a writing class (described below). Students also have the option to take a single credit physical education elective.

REQUIRED COURSE:
Perspective in Learning

This course is designed to introduce students to theories related to the cognitive, social, emotional, and cultural dimensions of learning. The purpose of the course is to foster self-awareness, critical thinking, strategic learning, and self-advocacy. Metacognition and critical thinking will be prominent themes throughout this course. Students will reflect on learning and teaching processes while applying learning strategies that can be transferred to other courses of study as a proactive approach to self-advocacy. Strategies for active reading, note-taking, test-taking, long-term project planning, and organizing materials will be modeled, practiced, and assessed. Students will be expected to critically read, discuss, and utilize a body of readings for a variety of academic tasks. In addition, students will learn about the laws that protect individuals with disabilities, receive an in-depth orientation to the on-campus services that provide academic and emotional support, and establish short and long-term goals related to promoting effective self-management. Credits: 3.000

Students will choose one developmental writing course:
Structure, Style, and Strategies: Demystifying Academic Writing
This course examines in detail the various factors that may have caused students to struggle with college writing, while taking a highly individual approach to the development of self-understanding and effective strategy use. Because most students in the course have had the experience of being diagnosed or labeled with some type of learning difference, the course uses self-understanding of learning differences and your social context as a focus for writing assignments. Students are expected to complete regular writing assignments inside and out of class to improve fluency, to engage in a variety of strategies for planning, generating, and organizing papers, and to complete several papers.

Establishing an Effective Writing Process: Improving Your Academic Functioning
In this course, students will learn and practice approaches to managing college writing assignments by generating daily writing and learning how to improve executive function. Included is the examination of various genres of writing. Students can elect to take this course for credit, and are required to submit a completed e-Folio of writing assignments demonstrating proficiency in writing skills.

Track B—Combined Developmental and Credit Track

Students in Track B will take the required non-credit Narrowing the Gap class and their choice of a single credit elective course from the list below.

REQUIRED COURSE for all visiting college students:
Perspective in Learning
This course is designed to introduce students to theories related to the cognitive, social, emotional, and cultural dimensions of learning. The purpose of the course is to foster self-awareness, critical thinking, strategic learning, and self-advocacy. Metacognition and critical thinking will be prominent themes throughout this course. Students will reflect on learning and teaching processes while applying learning strategies that can be transferred to other courses of study as a proactive approach to self-advocacy. Strategies for active reading, note-taking, test-taking, long-term project planning, and organizing materials will be modeled, practiced, and assessed. Students will be expected to critically read, discuss, and utilize a body of readings for a variety of academic tasks. In addition, students will learn about the laws that protect individuals with disabilities, receive an in-depth orientation to the on-campus services that provide academic and emotional support, and establish short and long-term goals related to promoting effective self-management. Credits: 3.000

CREDIT ELECTIVES for 2018:
All colleges don’t always accept all transfer credits. Students intending to transfer credits back to their home institution are encouraged to identify the most suitable course with their home institution.

Ceramics I (Monday – Friday, 9 – 11:30 am)
This course will ground students in the fundamentals of ceramics and introduce them to clay techniques, tools, materials, and visual language as experienced through hand building and wheel throwing. Students will explore several significant genres such as Japanese ceramics, Bennington potters, pottery of the Southwest, as well as contemporary artists working in the medium. Students will also take advantage of the rich resource of potters in Windham County by visiting other studios and hearing guest lectures from established potters. Students will develop individual goals in formal and non-traditional approaches with guidance from the instructors. A major component of the course is for students to take responsible ownership of the studio space, expressed through student commitment to work independently, to honor all safety procedures, and to keep the space in good condition. Credits: 3.000

Relationships & Relational Communication (Monday – Friday, 9 – 11:30 am)
By studying the practical and theoretical aspects of relational communication, students in this course will learn the techniques for managing the communication demands of meaningful intimate relationships. Students will investigate the role of self-awareness, perception, listening, nonverbal communication, gender difference, and ethics in resolving conflicts and creating more successful interactions between intimate partners, friends, and family members. Current research and theory on topics such as attraction, equity, power, gender, and marriage will be explored. Students will be introduced to a range of literature and research from several disciplines. Relational communication skills will be practiced through various experiential formats, such as role-playing, simulations, observations, and in-depth analysis of everyday interpersonal exchanges. As a discussion based course, students will be regularly assessed on discussion practices as well as complete assignments such as several 3 – 5 page research papers on various theories followed by the 8 – 12 comparative analysis paper. For a final project, students will (metaphorically) construct a personal “relationship toolbox.” Students must have completed three courses at the 2000 level, with grades of C or higher, as prerequisites for this course. One of these prerequisite courses must be either a COM 2000 or HIS/HUM/PHI 2000 level course. Credits: 3.000

Personal Finance (Monday – Friday, 1:30 – 4 pm)
This course provides students with a foundation upon which to develop life-long personal financial management skills. Topics include: the importance of personal finance; financial planning and the time-value of money; money management skills such as budgeting, balancing a checkbook, taxes, cash management, credit/debit cards, and major purchases (auto, home, education); insurance (property/liability, health, life); and investments (stocks, bonds, mutual funds, portfolio management, real estate, retirement planning). Math Level 5 or higher required. Credits: 3.000

Religion & Popular Culture (Monday – Friday, 1:30 – 4:00 p.m.)
This course examines some of the complex ways in which religion and popular culture interact and explores the possible significance of those interactions. Students will examine the intersection of religion and popular culture by considering a range of popular media (e.g., the internet, movies, television, music) and topics (e.g., current events, advertising, self-help spirituality, and sports and recreation). Students must have completed three courses at the 2000 level, with grades of C or higher, as prerequisites for this course. Credits: 3.000

Introduction to Biology: Organisms and Environment (Monday – Friday, 1 – 4 p.m.)
This course aims to deepen the scientific and biological literacy of students not majoring in Life Science. In contrast to traditional, vocabulary-dense biology courses, this course will offer students the opportunity for a more personally relevant biology experience focused on applying scientific inquiry to current biological issues. The process of how scientists study the biological world and biological evolution provides the thematic foundation for the course. Topics and themes addressed will be drawn from nutrition, health and disease; genetics and biotechnology; and ecology and environmental studies. Primary learning modes include lecture, discussion, presentations, case studies, laboratory investigations and field trips. Students will be expected to demonstrate their understanding of the course content through a variety of written and oral assessments. Lab included. Credits: 4.000

Acting I (Monday – Friday, 9 – 11:30 a.m.)
A beginning course focusing on the fundamentals of acting, including action, objective, character, physical life, listening, and language. Students will act in exercises, monologues, and short scenes that will encourage them to explore the actor’s craft. Students will also read plays to begin fostering a knowledge of both scene study and interpretation. Students are expected to rehearse outside of class and to keep an acting journal during the semester. Credits: 3.000

TRACK B Credit Electives – Landmark College strives to provide you with the courses you choose. However, enrollment is limited to 15 students per class to ensure a highly personalized learning experience. For this reason, classes are assigned on a first come, first come basis, based on date of deposit. Students choosing to enroll in Track B only, please indicate your top four elective choices, with #1 being your first choice.

OPTIONAL Physical Education Courses

(1 credit each, additional fee applies)

All students have the option of enrolling in one physical education course. If you plan to take a PE course, please indicate your first (1), second (2), and third (3) choice below. We will only place you in one PE class. If we are unable to place you in a PE course due to capacity, we will contact you. We cannot guarantee that you will be able to switch to another course. The course fee per course is $275 each, and this is non-refundable, even if you drop the course. PLEASE NOTE: Not all colleges accept PE credits. If you intend to transfer the credit, please coordinate this with your college ahead of time.

Beginner T’ai Chi Chuan
Students will learn the 24 Form style of T’ai Chi. The goal of the class is to help students focus on their own inner activity, develop a greater sense of being centered in the world, and to discover a system that promotes overall health. Students must be willing to participate in a slow moving, silent, meditative practice. Course may not be repeated. Credits: 1.000

Advanced T’ai Chi Chuan
In Advanced T’ai Chi Chuan, students will be introduced to advanced forms practiced in T’ai Chi Chuan. The goal of the class is to help students focus on their inner mental activity, develop a greater sense of being centered in their environment, and to develop an appreciation of physical and mental well-being. Students must be willing to participate in a slow moving, silent, meditative practice. Classes will begin with an overview of advanced T’ai Chi skills, followed by a review of forms. Students will be assessed on content knowledge and demonstration of skill proficiency throughout the semester.

Gentle Flow Yoga
This course supports students interested in exploring mind/body integration and offers an appealing option for balancing academic work with a healthy lifestyle. A simple practice geared towards beginners and/or anyone needing a slower paced class. Simple yoga postures, breathing and relaxation techniques as well as self-awareness are covered. This class will focus on slow movements and foundational yoga poses meant to support the body in releasing tension and invoking calm and relaxation. Assessments will be based on a willingness to explore yoga practice through regular attendance and active participation.

Hiking
Hiking is designed to teach students basic skills to learn how to make hiking enjoyable and safe. Each week there will be hikes on and off campus. Students will learn about hiking equipment, the Hikers Responsibility Code, basic plant identification and simple use of a map and compass.

Basic Daily Schedule, Monday through Friday

9 – 11:30 a.m.
In Class Session: Narrowing the Gap, OR Writing Course, OR Credit Elective

11:30 a.m. – 1:20 p.m.
Free Time (lunch, coursework, office hours, advisor meetings, etc.)

1:30 – 4 p.m.
In Class Session: Narrowing the Gap, OR Writing Course, OR Credit Elective

Afternoon & Evening
Optional PE courses meet twice a week for one hour and 15 minutes. Classes meet at various times, beginning at 4:30 p.m., with some courses beginning at 7 p.m.

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