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LD Professional Certificate Course Descriptions

Learning Differences (LD) and Neurodiversity: Specialization in Executive Function

Application deadline is November 19 for the next set of courses.

 

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Course 1: Understanding and Supporting Diverse Learners

Course 2: Academic Strategies And Executive Function Supports For Students with LD, ADHD, and ASD

Course 3: Student Engagement, Self-Regulation, and Motivation

Course 4: Online, Blended, and Classroom Technologies for Diverse Learners

Course 5: Capstone Project: Applying EF In Varying Educational Contexts
 

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Course 1: Understanding and Supporting Diverse Learners

Enroll in Course 1 during either Fall or Spring I terms:

  • Fall: September 14–November 11, 2018
  • Spring I: February 15–April 14, 2019

This course provides a core understanding of learning theories, frameworks, and best practices for working effectively with students who learn differently. Participants will explore definitions, research, historical trends, and legal mandates related to learning disabilities (including dyslexia and dyscalculia); ADHD; and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Students will deepen their understanding of innovative practices, incorporating Universal Design, executive function supports, and emerging educational technologies. They will explore how these approaches can be applied and adapted to provide optimal learning.

View the syllabus for Understanding and Supporting Diverse Learners

Course 2: Academic Strategies and Executive Function Supports for Students With LD, ADHD, and ASD

Enroll in Course 2 during either Winter or Spring II terms:

  • Winter: November 30, 2018–February 3, 2019
  • Spring II: April 26–June 23, 2019

What strategies and supports have proven to be effective in promoting academic success for students with learning and executive function challenges? This course presents evidence-based, classroom-tested strategies, many developed at Landmark College, that help nontraditional learners thrive in academic settings. The first module reviews critical factors to consider when designing effective instruction: processing speed, working memory, executive skills, within the framework of Cognitive Load Theory. The second module describes the features of an EF-Friendly Classroom. Each subsequent module presents a process or strategic approach that addresses difficulties in the following areas: academic reading, academic writing, note-taking, studying and test preparation, and math. The course considers no-, low-, and high-technology approaches that belong in every educator’s instructional toolkit. As a culminating project, participants will synthesize course learning to create student profiles and learning plans.

View the syllabus for Academic Strategies and Executive Function Supports for Students with LD, ADHD, and ASD

Course 3: Student Engagement, Self-Regulation, and Motivation

Enroll in Course 3 during either Spring I or Summer terms:

  • Spring I: February 15–April 14, 2019
  • Summer: July 7–September 2, 2018

One of the most perplexing challenges educators face is to how to effectively motivate students. Relatedly, how do we promote self-directed learning in our students? In this course, we will use the broad construct of self-regulation as a framework for addressing these questions in diverse learners, including students with a learning disability (LD), executive function (EF) challenges, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants in the course will examine a range of strategies and systems to support, actualize, and sustain student engagement. Specific topics covered include: employing active learning as a motivational tool, encouraging growth mindsets and persistence, developing meta-cognition and self-advocacy, and promoting overall student wellness (including nutrition, sleep, exercise, and stress reduction).

View the syllabus for Student Engagement, Self-Regulation and Motivation

Course 4: Online, Blended, and Classroom Technologies for Diverse Learners

Enroll in Course 4 during either Spring II or Fall terms:

  • Spring II: April 26–June 23, 2019
  • Fall: September 14–November 11, 2018

How can we offer students learning opportunities that aren’t one-size-fits-all? This course explores how to leverage universal design to create flexible, engaging, and effective eLearning solutions—whether through online, face-to-face, or blended instruction. Designed for technologically savvy and not-so-savvy educators, the course “walks-the-talk” and immerses participants in novel approaches as both the medium and the message. As a final project, participants choose an eLearning technology to explore and evaluate from the perspectives of diverse learners—and diverse educators—and share their findings using that technology.

View the syllabus for Online, Blended and Classroom Technologies for Diverse Learners

Course 5: Capstone Project: Applying EF In Varying Educational Contexts

Enroll in Course 5 (Capstone) during either Summer or Winter terms:

  • Summer: July 5–September 1, 2019
  • Winter: November 30, 2018–February 3, 2019

This capstone course promotes the synthesis and integration of learning gained in the previous four certificate courses and provides opportunity for learners to apply what they have learned in their own educational contexts. Participants select an area of investigation that is relevant to their current vocational needs and professional interest in order to create a capstone project. When feasible, projects will be implemented at the learner’s institution to provide both immediate educational impact and an opportunity for learners to refine theoretical understandings and practical applications. The capstone course offers options for personalizing the learning experience by selecting experiences, readings, and modes of expression that best suit participants’ goals and learning profile. Each participant will design their on-campus learning experience from a menu of options, guided by the support of a Landmark College faculty mentor.

Capstone learners can spend 2–3 days on the College’ campus, supplemented by distance communications (phone, Skype, email) engaging in experiences relevant to their chosen project. The residency is timed to coincide with Landmark College summer programs: participants have access to LC’s faculty and staff and are able to engage in observations, professional dialogue, research, and writing focused on synthesizing and integrating learning.

Capstone students have gone on to:

  • Design websites for their schools
  • Restructure procedures and policies for incoming students with disabilities
  • Publish their work in peer-reviewed journals

View the syllabus for the Capstone Project: Applying EF in Varying Educational Contexts

Learn more about Landmark College’s Professional Certificate program on Learning Differences (LD) and Neurodiversity


Certificate Program Overview
 

Certificate Program Pricing & FAQ

 

Still have questions? Give us a call or email us at:

Landmark College Institute for Research and Training
(802) 387-1662
institute@landmark.edu

 

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