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Learning Differences and Neurodiversity (LDN) course descriptions

Application deadline is October 31, 2021 for the next set of courses.

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Course 1 (LDN631): Understanding and Supporting Diverse Learners

Course 2a (LDN633): Academic Strategies and Executive Function Supports For Students with LD, ADHD, and Autism

Course 2b: (LDN641): Academic and Cognitive Supports for Autistic Students

Course 3a (LDN638): Student Engagement, Self-Regulation, and Motivation

Course 3b (LDN634): Social and Emotional Supports for Autistic Students

Course 4 (LDN640): Online, Blended, and Classroom Technologies for Diverse Learners

Course 5a (LDN645): Capstone Project: Applying EF In Varying Educational Contexts

Course 5b: (LDN646) Capstone Project: Supporting Autistic Students on Campus and Online
 

“I found this to be one of the most productive things I’ve done in my career.”

– Former certificate course student
Read more student testimonials

Course 1 (LDN631): Understanding and Supporting Diverse Learners

Enroll in Course 1 during either Fall or Spring I terms:

  • Fall: September 10 – November 7, 2021
  • Spring I: February 4 – April 3, 2022

Professor helping student using a tablet

This course, designed for both beginners and veteran education professionals, starts with an understanding of neurodiversity, current research findings on learning and executive function, and changes in legal mandates; and expands to incorporate application of evidence-based practices such as universal design for learning and coaching-like approaches for addressing executive function difficulties among diverse learners.

View the syllabus for Understanding and Supporting Diverse Learners*

Course 2a (LDN633): Academic Strategies and Executive Function Supports for Students with LD, ADHD, and Autism

Enroll in Course 2 during either Winter or Spring II terms:

  • Winter: November 19, 2021 – January 23, 2022
  • Spring II: April 15 – June 12, 2022

Professor helping student with course work

What strategies and supports have proven to be effective in promoting academic success for students with learning and executive function challenges? This course presents evidence-based, classroom-tested strategies, many developed at Landmark College, that help nontraditional learners thrive in academic settings. The first module reviews critical factors to consider when designing effective instruction: processing speed, working memory, executive skills, within the framework of Cognitive Load Theory. The second module describes the features of an EF-Friendly Classroom. Each subsequent module presents a process or strategic approach that addresses difficulties in the following areas: academic reading, academic writing, note-taking, studying and test preparation, and math. The course considers no-, low-, and high-technology approaches that belong in every educator’s instructional toolkit. As a culminating project, participants will synthesize course learning to create student profiles and learning plans.

View the syllabus for Academic Strategies and Executive Function Supports for Students with LD, ADHD, and Autism*

Course 2b (LDN641): Academic and Cognitive Supports for Autistic Students

Enroll in Course 2b during Winter:

  • Winter: November 19, 2021 – January 23, 2022

Student and faculty facing each other smiling

How do we ensure that individuals with autism have the academic skills to be able to attend and find success in high school and college environments? This course will address this question by providing an overview of evidence-based strategies to help students develop academic skills (i.e., reading, writing, mathematics) and the facilitators of those skills (i.e., learning/study strategies including time management, self-determination/self-advocacy, and independence). The course opens with a general overview of the challenges faced by individuals with autism as they move from high school to college including a discussion of the differences in the legal protections in these environments. Next, strategies for supporting students with autism in general education settings and providing them with individualized academic instruction, will be discussion. Additional topics include fostering independence, developing learning/study strategies, promotion self-determination/advocacy, assessing college readiness, and leveraging technology to support autistic individuals during their secondary education experiences.

View the syllabus for Academic and Cognitive Supports for Autistic Students*
 

Course 3a (LDN638): Student Engagement, Self-Regulation, and Motivation

Enroll in Course 3 during either Spring I or Summer terms:

  • Spring I: February 4 – April 3, 2022
  • Summer: June 24 – August 21, 2022

student asking a question in a classroom

One of the most perplexing challenges educators face is to know how to effectively motivate students. Relatedly, how do we promote self-directed learning in our students? In this course, we will use the broad construct of self-regulation as a framework for addressing these questions in diverse learners, including students with a learning disability, executive function (EF) challenges, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or autism. Participants in the course will examine a range of strategies and systems to support, actualize, and sustain student engagement. Specific topics covered include: employing active learning as a motivational tool, encouraging growth mindsets and persistence, developing meta-cognition and self-advocacy, and promoting overall student wellness (including nutrition, sleep, exercise, and stress reduction).

View the syllabus for Student Engagement, Self-Regulation, and Motivation*
 

Course 3b (LDN634): Social and Emotional Supports for Autistic Students

Enroll in Course 3b during Spring I term:

  • Spring I: February 4 – April 3, 2022

Student and professor facing each other

This course will highlight the social emotional issues faced by autistic students in secondary and post-secondary educational settings. After a general overview of autism, including an exploration of the medical and neurodiversity models, this course will examine developmental challenges faced by autistic adolescents and young adults. The course will address programs and strategies that foster student success, including insights from Landmark College professionals working with autistic students. Specific topics covered include co-occurring conditions, identity, social-emotional support, transitions to adulthood, camouflaging, and issues specific to girls and young women. Course participants will explore practical applications of the theoretical constructs and models in autism to their own educational environments. This course will also explore contemporary issues, including the move to online learning and work.

View the syllabus for Social and Emotional Supports for Autistic Students

Course 4 (LDN640): Online, Blended, and Classroom Technologies for Diverse Learners

Enroll in Course 4 during either Spring II or Fall terms:

  • Fall: September 10 – November 7, 2021
  • Spring II: April 15 – June 12, 2022

Two professors reviewing course on tablet.

How can we offer students learning opportunities that are not “one-size-fits-all”? This course explores how to leverage Universal Design for Learning (UDL) to create flexible, engaging, and effective eLearning solutions—whether through online, face-to-face, or blended instruction. Designed for technologically savvy and not-so-savvy educators, the course “walks-the-talk” and immerses participants in novel learning approaches as both the medium and the message. As a project-oriented course, participants choose an eLearning technology to explore and evaluate from the perspectives of diverse learners—and diverse educators—and share their findings using that technology.
This course employs and models innovative, UDL-based eLearning approaches to maximize participants’ opportunity to master the learning objectives:

  1. Varied Technologies: Instructors deploy a wide variety of common and emerging eLearning techniques and technologies throughout the course.
  2. Active Digital Participation: Participants learn and demonstrate use of eLearning technologies as part of their assignment.
  3. Persona Embodiment: Each participant identifies a distinct “persona” representing a particular set of disabilities, challenges, learning characteristics, and/or skills, and participate in synchronous and asynchronous discussion from the perspective of this persona.

View the syllabus for Online, Blended and Classroom Technologies for Diverse Learners*

Course 5a (LDN645): Capstone Project: Applying EF In Varying Educational Contexts

Enroll in Course 5a (EF Capstone) during either Summer or Winter terms:

  • Winter: November 19, 2021 – January 23, 2022
  • Summer: June 24 – August 21, 2021

professional learner in a classroom

The capstone course promotes the synthesis and integration of learning gained in the previous four certificate courses and provides opportunity for learners to apply what they have learned in their own educational contexts. Participants select an area of investigation that is relevant to their current vocational needs and professional interest in order to create a capstone project. The capstone course offers options for personalizing the learning experience by selecting experiences, readings, and modes of expression that best suit participants’ goals and learning profile.

Capstone students have gone on to:

  • Design websites for their schools
  • Restructure procedures and policies for incoming students with disabilities
  • Publish their work in peer-reviewed journals

View the syllabus for the Capstone Project: Applying EF in Varying Educational Contexts*

Course 5b (LDN646): Capstone Project: Supporting Autistic Students on Campus and Online

Enroll in Course 5b (Autism Capstone) during either Summer or Winter terms:

  • Winter: November 19, 2021 – January 23, 2022
  • Summer: June 24 – August 21, 2022

Faculty working with student

This capstone course promotes the synthesis and integration of knowledge acquisition and learning experiences gained in the previous four courses, and provides an opportunity for students to apply what they have learned to their own educational context. Students select an area of investigation that is relevant to their current vocational needs and professional interests in order to create a capstone project. Whenever possible, projects are designed to be implemented at a student’s current academic institution. Such experiences provide both immediate feedback and an opportunity for the student to refine theoretical understandings and practical applications. The capstone course offers options for personalizing the learning experience by selecting topics, readings, and modes of expression that best match students’ goals and learning needs. Student designs their own capstone experience from a menu of options, guided by the instructor.

View the syllabus for the Capstone Project: Supporting Autistic Students on Campus and Online*

*Note: Course syllabi subject to change each term.

 

Learn more about Landmark College’s certificate program in Learning Differences and Neurodiversity


Certificate Program Overview
 

Certificate Program Pricing & FAQ

 

Still have questions? Give us a call or email us at:

Landmark College Institute for Research and Training
(802) 387-1662
institute@landmark.edu

 

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