Course Descriptions

The World Languages Department offers courses in Spanish, French, Greek, Linguistics and American Sign Language.

SP1000: Survival Spanish
Credits: 1.000 - This course is for students with no previous instruction in Spanish. The goals of this one-credit, pass/fail course are to support and enhance the experiences of students planning to attend a Study Abroad program in a Spanish speaking country. The focus will be on listening and speaking skills in a variety of commonly encountered situations necessary for travel and basic survival. The class will meet three hours per week starting at the mid-point of the semester. Note that the credit does not transfer, but can be applied towards graduation credits.

SP1011: Elementary Spanish I
Credits: 3.000 - This introductory course, intended for those with no previous instruction in Spanish, focuses on basic conversational Spanish. Through interactive and multisensory teaching, this course introduces students to Spanish phonology, syllabication, syntax and basic verbs. Students learn to use Spanish to initiate basic conversations, to communicate about themselves and to negotiate basic exchanges in the marketplace. Students will be expected to identify learning strategies that are particularly useful in learning a foreign language. Students will also strengthen general knowledge about parts of the world in which Spanish is spoken.

SP1012: Elementary Spanish II
Credits: 3.000 - This course is a continuation of Spanish 1011. Students review, strengthen and expand basic structures and maintain proficiency in self-expression and social exchanges. Students will also increase vocabulary and the ability to perform a range of functions, including extending invitations, describing people, relating daily routines, asking for directions, buying food and preparing authentic dishes. Students will continue to develop appreciation for Spanish cultures and an understanding of themselves as learners of Spanish.janie duncan

SP2011: Intermediate Spanish I
Credits: 3.000 - This course seeks to maintain proficiency in areas previously studied in Spanish 1011 and 1012, while expanding the students' facility and accuracy in expressive and receptive language. Spanish 2011 includes the basic language and cultural awareness needed to negotiate travel independently in a Spanish-speaking country. Students also learn to narrate their experiences using the simple preterit. As part of this course, students research a Spanish-speaking country and create a trip itinerary for the class.


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FR1011 Elementary French I
Credits: 3.000 - This is an introduction to basic conversational French and Francophone culture. Through interactive and multisensory teaching, this course focuses on the French sound system, basic grammar and vocabulary. Students learn to use French to initiate basic conversation, to communicate about themselves and to negotiate basic exchanges. Students will be expected to identify learning strategies that are particularly useful in learning a foreign language. Students will also strengthen general knowledge about parts of the world in which French is spoken.

FR1012 Elementary French II
Credits: 3.000 - This course is a continuation of French 1011. Students will review fundamental language structures and vocabulary while continuing to develop self-expression and their ability to perform a range of tasks such as planning an outing, offering and accepting invitations, describing people, talking about daily routines and comparing past and present activities. Students will continue to learn about Francophone cultures and to develop an awareness of themselves as learners of the French language.

FR2011 Intermediate French I
Credits: 3.000 - The goals of this course are to strengthen and expand proficiency in areas previously studied in French 1011 and 1012 or the equivalent level of proficiency, while building the students' ability to create with language. French 2011 is designed to give students the basic language and cross-cultural awareness needed to travel independently in a French-speaking country. Students learn to buy tickets, arrange for transportation, check into hotels, make purchases, ask for directions, order in restaurants and change money. Students also learn to narrate in the past.


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GR1000 Survival Greek 
Credits: 1.000 - This course is for students with no previous instruction in Greek. The goals of this one-credit, pass/fail course are to support and enhance the experiences of students planning to attend a Study Abroad program in Greece. The focus will be on listening and speaking skills in a variety of commonly encountered situations necessary for travel and basic survival. The class meets three hours per week starting at the mid-point of the semester. Note that the credit does not transfer but can be applied towards graduation credits.


LI1011: Introduction to Linguistics
Credits: 3.000 - What is language? What enables us to understand one another when we communicate with language? These are questions that linguists seek to answer when they study world languages. This course helps students bring to conscious awareness skills they used as children to learn their native tongue, and then apply these skills to the study of any language. Students engage in linguistic analysis of all types beginning with sound (phonology), progressing to words (morphology), meaning (semantics), sentences (syntax) and conversation (discourse). By the end of the course, students should be able to analyze samples from a language entirely unknown to them, identify and classify sounds, words and sentences and explain how speakers of that language use these elements to convey meaning to one another. Knowing how to analyze linguistic patterns is empowering; it helps us understand our own patterns of language use, enabling us to change the way we speak to better communicate in different contexts. It frees us to learn other languages and enter other cultures with confidence and skill. Finally, the ability to discover patterns in social behavior and infer what they mean enhances our ability to learn in any setting. Ultimately, this course is about expanding our world by learning how different people talk about it.


 

SL1011: Elementary American Sign Language I
Credits: 3.000 - This introductory course is for those with little or no previous instruction in American Sign Language (ASL). Through interactive and multisensory teaching, this course introduces students to the structural principles governing ASL. The course will focus on mastery of receptive and expressive skills. Students will apply linguistic features learned through in-class discussions and self-study. Students will move at a deliberate pace over most of the features of the language: cherology (phonology), morphology, syntax, semantics and sign usage. As one of the course projects, students will research Deaf culture and make a class presentation.

 

SL1012: Elementary American Sign Language II
Credits: 3.000 - This is a continuation of the introductory course in American Sign Language. Through interactive and multisensory teaching, this course expands students' awareness of the structural principles governing ASL and continues to help students focus on mastery of receptive and expressive skills. Students will apply linguistic features learned through in-class presentation, practice and self-study. Students will move at a deliberate pace over most of the features of the language: cherology (phonology), morphology, syntax, semantics and sign usage. Sample functions covered include giving directions, describing others, making requests, discussing family and occupations and relating routines. As one of the course projects, students will research Deaf culture and make a class presentation.

 

Questions?

Janie Duncan
Chair, World Languages Dept
802-387-6855
jduncan@landmark.edu