Course Descriptions

NS0911: Fundamentals of Biology
Credits: 0.000 - Fundamentals of Biology explores a range of topics and prepares students, by teaching strategies and skills, for success in freshman-level college science courses. The course covers the following topics: the scientific method as a tool of inquiry, cellular structure and function, ecology and taxonomy and basic plant and animal biology. Prerequisites: None


NS1011: Introduction to Biology - Cells and Organisms
Credits: 4.000 - This course examines the key concepts of modern biology with an emphasis on the cellular aspects of life, the key concepts of traditional and contemporary genetics and an overview of the diversity of life through the study of evolution. Lab included. Prerequisites: None

NS1021: Introduction to Biology - Organisms & Environment
Credits: 4.000 - This course examines the key concepts of modern biology with an emphasis on the relationships between organisms and their environment. Studies of evolution and genetics are woven into this theme and provide students with additional perspectives on the biological world. Lab included. Prerequisites: None

NS1111: Introduction to Chemistry
Credits: 4.000 - Descriptive, rather than rigorously mathematical, this course serves as a general introduction to chemistry. Starting with atomic structure as a foundation, the course moves through chemical bonds, reactions, chemical equations, mass relationships and acid-base chemistry. Lab included. Prerequisites: Math Level 5

NS1211: Introduction to Physical Science
Credits: 4.000 - This course is a study of universal concepts governing physical interactions which includes selected topics in physics, chemistry,  geology, and astronomy. The course begins by developing an understanding of basic physics: motion, mechanics, and energy, then continues to basic topics in chemistry, geology, and astronomy. General chemistry is introduced within this framework before moving to the study of major physical processes within the earth and the evolution of the universe. Process analysis, terminology, scientific methodology and the synthesis of ideas are stressed. Approximately half the course involves the study of physics, so there is a strong emphasis on the practical applications of various mathematical ideas. Students should be willing to do a considerable amount of mathematical thinking in this class. Lab included. Prerequisites: Math level 5 

NS1311: Introduction to Geology
Credits: 4.000 - This course includes many topics of basic Geology including: geologic time, Earth structure, minerals and rocks, plate tectonics and related phenomena, landforms and geomorphism, geology and current events, plus climate change of the past. Students will have the opportunity to study each topic in depth in the regular classroom through notes, discussions, various group activities and visual materials from various media. There is a weekly lab session devoted to the hands-on exploration of inquiry-based investigations of rock and mineral identification, landform interpretation, map reading and other relevant topics and skills. In order to apply the observational and interpretive skills presented, field work will be an important part of the course. Lab included. Prerequisites: None


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NS2001: Perspectives in Evolution
Credits: 4.000 - Evolution is a term charged with both emotion and controversy. Too often, discussions surrounding this topic don't focus on what evolution is, and what it is not, from a truly scientific perspective. This course begins with an extended study of relevant topics in geology, such as plate tectonics, to create a solid underpinning for the study of evolution. It continues with a look at the ideas of Charles Darwin and the evidence of evolution, particularly the fossil record and the connections with genetics. The final unit explores the human evolution fossil record and the numerous controversies involved with interpreting those discoveries. Included throughout the course is an emphasis on how the discipline of science works in general, and how geology and evolution are prime examples of the workings of this process in particular. Non-scientific interpretations of the evidence are occasionally highlighted for contrast. Lab included. Prerequisites: NS1011 or NS1021 or NS1111 or NS1211 or NS1311 or NS1701 or NS1702 or NS Core Trans and EN1011 or EN1015 and FY1011 or FY1001.

NS2011: Introduction to Anatomy & Physiology of the Human Body
Credits: 4.000 - This course explores the structure and function of the human body with an emphasis on the interaction of parts. Body organization will be studied from the cellular level through tissue and organ structure, culminating with an examination of the major organ systems. Lab included. Prerequisites: NS1011 or NS1021 or NS1111 or NS1211 or NS1311 or NS1701 or NS1702 or NS Core Trans and EN1011 or EN1015 and FY1011 or FY1001.

NS2012: Nutrition and Health
Credits: 3.000 - Nutrition is critical for good health, yet many people have little understanding of the components of nutrition. Nutrition and Health introduces the concepts of human digestion and nutrient absorption, addresses nutrients from the perspectives of diet sources and roles in physiology and homeostasis, and provides an overview of nutritional and eating disorders. Course material is presented in a variety of modalities, including group activities, lectures, class discussions, case studies, animations and student presentations. Prerequisites: NS1011 or NS1021 or NS1111 or NS1211 or NS1311 or NS1701 or NS1702 or NS Core Trans and EN1011 or EN1015 and FY1011 or FY1001.

NS2041: Field Biology of Northern New England
Credits: 4.000 - This field-based class covers common plants, animals and fungi of Northern New England and the environments in which they live. Topics will include taxonomy, diversity, adaptations and interactions. Students will keep a field notebook, do a major field project and be expected to hike over varying terrain. Lab included. Prerequisites: NS1011 or NS1021 or NS1111 or NS1211 or NS1311 or NS1701 or NS1702 or NS Core Trans and EN1011 or EN1015 and FY1011 or FY1001.

NS2042: Field Biology of Northern New England
Credits: 3.000 - This field-based class covers common plants, animals and fungi of Northern New England and the environments in which they live. Topics will include taxonomy, diversity, adaptations and interactions. Students will keep a field notebook, do a field project and be expected to hike over varying terrain. Although there is no separate lab section for this class (it is a three-credit course) much of the course will take place in the outdoors doing lab and field activities. Prerequisites: NS1011 or NS1021 or NS1111 or NS1211 or NS1311 or NS1701 or NS1702 or NS Core Trans and EN1011 or EN1015 and FY1011 or FY1001.

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NS2051: Aquatic Ecology & Pollution
Credits: 4.000 - This summer course offers students an opportunity to carry out an in-depth investigation of the ecology and pollution of rivers and streams. The course weaves together lecture, student presentations, field trips, guest speakers and laboratory/field-based investigations. The content emphasis will be on the science and environmental issues related to the ecology and pollution of rivers and streams. Students will conduct intensive research on a local watershed, which will result in a presentation of their research findings to members of the Putney community. Lab included. Prerequisites: NS1011 or NS1021 or NS1111 or NS1211 or NS1311 or NS1701 or NS1702 or NS Core Trans and EN1011 or EN1015 and FY1011 or FY1001.

NS2061: Biological Psychology
Credits: 3.000 - Biological Psychology explores the brain from physiological, evolutionary and developmental perspectives. Topics include basic neuroanatomy and physiology, anatomy, development and plasticity of the brain, regulation of body homeostasis and the biological basis of behavior. Specific attention is directed toward comprehending and evaluating research methods and findings. Prerequisites: NS1011 or NS1021 or NS1111 or NS1211 or NS1311 or NS1701 or NS1702 or NS Core Trans and SS1011 or SS Core Trans and EN1011 or EN1015 and FY1011 or FY1001.

NS2221: Environmental Science
Credits: 4.000 - This course examines current environmental concerns and undertakes some relevant local field studies in environmental science. Emphasis is placed on the science behind environmental concerns, while the importance of policy and human values are also discussed. After an overview of population, resources and pollution, students undertake an in-depth analysis of water pollution, biological diversity, global warming and ozone depletion. Lab included. Prerequisites: NS1011 or NS1021 or NS1111 or NS1211 or NS1311 or NS1701 or NS1702 or NS Core Trans and EN1011 or EN1015 and FY1011 or FY1001.

NS2231: Contemporary Issues in Science
Credits: 3.000 - Contemporary Issues in Science is a course in which students will have the opportunity to explore in depth major topics of interest in the natural sciences. The course will consist of reading, writing, poster presentations, and online interactions in an atmosphere of respect for each individual's opinion. Topics will be drawn from current scientific research that has an impact on society, perhaps because of ethical, political, or social concerns. Students will need to read and think critically and skeptically, and present clear, well supported arguments both verbally and in writing. A portion of the course will include discussions, student review and critique of articles, as well as student responses to the reviews and critiques of others. A good deal of writing will be expected in the form of papers, responses, and critiques. This course may be used as part of the Environmental Science concentration as well as the AS degree. Course topics will be drawn from current environmental issues or other current science. Prerequisites: NS1011 or NS1021 or NS1111 or NS1211 or NS1311 or NS 1701 or NS 1702 or NS Core Trans or EN1011 or EN1015 and FY1011 or FY1001 

NS2232:  Introduction to Forensic Science
Credits: 3.000 - This is a survey course in forensic science that explores how the principles of biology and chemistry are used to solve crimes. The major modes of course content delivery include hands-on activities, lecture, video, guest lecturers, labs and online activities. Noteworthy famous forensics cases will be examined and discussed, and students are expected to present several cases throughout the course. Critical thinking and evidence-analysis skills will be regularly applied to "solve" cases. Topics include crime-scene analysis, history of forensic science, trace evidence, drugs and toxicology, serology, fingerprints, arson investigation, ballistics, hair and fibers, DNA, forensics entomology, questioned-document examination, forensic anthropology and pathology. Prerequisites: NS1011 or NS1021 or NS1111 or NS1211 or NS1311 or NS1701 or NS1702 or NS Core Trans and EN1011 or EN1015 and FY1011 or FY1001.


Associate Degree of Life Sciences Required Courses

NS1701: Principles of Biology I
Credits: 4.000 - This is an introductory course designed for Life Science majors that is open to any credit students. It will cover the following topics in greater depth than the current NS1021 course: evolution and diversity of life; processes of evolution including natural selection and allele frequency; population ecology; communities; species interactions; nutrient cycling, ecosystems; overviews of life’s domains . Emphasis will be made on applying the scientific method, including designing hypotheses, testing hypotheses, analyzing data, drawing conclusions, and communication via graphs, figures, writing, and speaking. Instructional methods will include discussions, lecture, lab work, field work, and many hands-on activities. Students will attend weekly labs, in which basic lab techniques such as microscopy and field research will be practiced. This course is open to any Landmark student who wishes to gain a deeper understanding of the living world; there are no pre-requisites and only students in the AS degree program need to take both NS1701 (Principles of Biology I) and NS1702 (Principles of Biology II), which may can be taken in any order. Students cannot take this course and NS 1011 or NS 1021 for credit.

NS1702: Principles of Biology II
Credits: 4.000 - This is an introductory course for Life Science majors that is open to all credit students. It will cover the following topics in greater depth than the current NS1011 course: basic life chemistry; cell composition and function; membrane transport; photosynthesis and cellular respiration; DNA synthesis, transcription and translation; gene regulation; mitosis and meiosis; and patterns of inheritance.  Emphasis will be made on applying the scientific method, including designing hypotheses, testing hypotheses, analyzing data, drawing conclusions, and communication via graphs, figures, writing, and speaking.  Information will be presented in a variety of modalities currently used at Landmark College including small group work, tactile and kinesthetic activities, reading and summarizing, videos, and lecture.  Students will attend weekly labs, in which lab techniques such as microscopy, micropipette use, DNA recombination, and gel electrophoresis will be practiced. This course is open to any Landmark student who wishes to gain a deeper understanding of the world of the cell; there are no pre-requisites and only students in the AS degree program need to take both Bio I and II in any order. Students cannot take this course and NS 1011 or NS 1021 for credit.

NS1801: Principles of Chemistry I
Credits: 4.000 - This course is designed for students interested in further study and/or careers in the sciences.  It will cover the following topics: atomic structure and periodicity, bonding, molecular geometry, chemical reactions and stoichiometry, gas laws, solution chemistry, and energy changes (thermodynamics.)  Emphasis will be placed on applying chemistry to current issues in the life sciences and the environment.  Information will be presented in a variety of modalities currently used at Landmark College including small group work, tactile and kinesthetic activities, reading and summarizing, videos, and lecture.  Students will attend weekly labs, in which steps of the scientific process such as experimental design, careful observation and recording of data are reviewed as students work cooperatively on projects. This course is open to any Landmark student who meets the prerequisites and wishes to gain a deeper understanding of chemistry. Prerequisites: None.

NS1802: Principles of Chemistry II
Credits: 4.000 - Principles of Chemistry II is the second semester of a two-semester first-year chemistry sequence. The course continues from Principles of Chemistry I, covering the topics of thermochemistry, kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, and electrochemistry, with an introduction to organic and biochemistry if time permits. As in the first semester, examples to illustrate the material will be drawn from multiple fields, including medicine and the allied health fields, environmental science and biology, as well as industrial chemistry. Prerequisites: NS1801

NS2701: Anatomy and Physiology I
Credits: 4.000 - This course, with its sequel (NS2702), is designed to provide a thorough overview of the basic tissue systems of the human, with particular emphasis on the concepts of “form follows function” and homeostatic regulation.  This course will begin with an overview of the four main classifications of tissues: epithelial, connective, muscle, and nervous.  Human organ systems will be covered, including the skeletal, muscular, nervous, and endocrine systems (with other systems to be covered in NS2702).  In addition to applying scientific skills learned in NS1701 and NS1702, students will become proficient in histology, understand and articulate how organ/tissue structure is related to function, comprehend the homeostatic mechanisms required to keep all systems in balance, and apply knowledge to predict what will happen if homeostasis is interrupted.  Information will be presented in variety of modalities currently used at Landmark College including small group work, tactile and kinesthetic activities, reading and summarizing, videos, and lecture.  Students will attend weekly labs, in which basic lab techniques such as histology/microscopy, dissection, and basic physiological measurements will be practiced. This course is open to students who are enrolled in the Associate in Life Science degree program and have successfully completed NS1701 and NS1702.

NS2702: Anatomy and Physiology II
Credits: 4.000 - This course, with its prequel (NS2701), is designed to provide a thorough overview of the basic tissue systems of the human, with particular emphasis on the concepts of “form follows function” and homeostatic regulation.  This course will pick up where NS2701 leaves off.  Human organ systems to be covered include the cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary, digestive, and reproductive systems.  In addition to applying scientific skills learned in NS1701 and NS1702, students will become proficient in histology, understand and articulate how organ/tissue structure is related to function, comprehend the homeostatic mechanisms required to keep all systems in balance, and apply knowledge to predict what will happen if homeostasis is interrupted.  Information will be presented in variety of modalities currently used at Landmark College including small group work, tactile and kinesthetic activities, reading and summarizing, videos, and lecture.  Students will attend weekly labs, in which basic lab techniques such as histology/microscopy, dissection, and basic physiological measurements will be practiced. This course is open to students who are enrolled in the Associate in Life Science degree program and have successfully completed NS2701.

NS1601: Life Sciences Career Seminar
Credits: 1.000 - This course introduces students to the diversity of careers available to those with a background in life science. The career areas to be covered include: The health sciences (pharmaceutical, medical technicians, medical services, nursing, Emergency Medical Technician, paramedic, etc.) veterinary science, biotechnology, laboratory technicians, agriculture, bioinformatics, environmental and field work, toxicology and microbiology. In addition to exposure to the different careers available, students will analyze their interests, skills and strengths with learning and aptitude inventories. They will also develop a resume and cover letter that markets their experience. Course material will be presented in a variety of group activities, lectures, class discussions, student presentations and site visits. Guest speakers from a diversity of fields will present to the class on their fields.

NS2601: Bioethics
Credits: 3.000 - This course is designed for students interested in further study and/or careers in the sciences. It will cover the following topics: Introduction to ethics and bioethics; human rights; benefit and harm; consent; privacy and confidentiality; equality, justice and equity; protecting future generations; and protection of the environment. Emphasis will be placed on applying ethical reasoning to many different topics, with specific examples drawn from biology and medicine. The course will, in broad outline, follow the syllabus of the Bioethics Core Curriculum from the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) which is based on the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights. This course is a hybrid course, with both online and face-to-face components. This course is open to any Landmark student who has met the prerequisites and wishes to gain a deeper understanding of scientific ethics. Prerequisites: EN1011, EN1021 or permission of department chair.
 

Questions? Please contact me for more information!

Abigail Littlefield
Chair, Natural Science Dept.
802-387-1629
alittlefield@landmark.edu