Course Descriptions

HU0911: Twentieth Century History
Credits: 0.000 - This course investigates the causes and consequences of major 20th century world events. Subjects include both world wars and their aftermath, the evolution of world ideological tensions and the challenges that confront nations in today's developing world. Through an integration of readings, lectures and discussions, and with an emphasis on reading and listening comprehension skills, students expand their knowledge of the historical context leading to current world conditions. Pre-Requisites: None

HU0921: American Communities
Credits: 0.000 - This course uses an “American Studies” approach to look at a particular community of America’s past and present. The course may trace the history of a specific locale such as Harlem or Salem, or a theme based on an American community. Whatever the selected topic, the emphasis is on reading skills and comprehension, organizational skills, analytical and critical thinking, test-preparation and test-taking, and written composition with a process. Pre-Requisites: None

HU0931: Introduction to World Religions
Credits: 0.000 - This course is a general introduction to the major religions of the world: Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Students will explore the major perspectives in each tradition: the historical backgrounds, the key stories, the lives of the founders, the basic theological concepts, teachings, and practices as well as variations within each faith. Students will also explore each religion through a generous sampling of works of art. In addition to textbook readings and discussions, students will view and evaluate films and documentaries, work with concepts of geography important to the origin and spread of the religions, and encounter actual practitioners of each tradition who will visit the classroom to speak of their beliefs and to answer questions. Pre-Requisites: None

HU095: Introduction to Classical Mythology
Credits: 0.000 - This course is a general introduction to the study of ancient Greco-Roman myths. Students will explore the genealogy of the gods and the stories of the major heroes. They will also encounter fabled creatures, accursed families, and storied realms. Students will explore basic ways of understanding and interpreting myths. Pre-Requisites: None



top

HU1011: Humanities I - Ancient & Medieval Western Culture
Credits: 3.000 - This course examines the evolution of seminal ideas of enduring significance for Western civilization. Students trace ideas about religion, philosophy, politics, economics, technology and aesthetics from classical Greece through Roman civilization to the Christian and Muslim cultures of the Middle Ages. Students are encouraged to draw parallels between the early forms of these ideas and their expression in current society. Pre-Requisites: None

HU1012: Humanities II - Renaissance to the Present
Credits: 3.000 - This course traces the development of Western civilization from the Renaissance to the present. Because this period includes the era of European expansion, the course focuses not only on Europe, but also on the reciprocal impact of Europe and the wider world. In addition to focusing on historical conditions, there is a great deal of emphasis on relating artistic, literary and musical works to their historical context. Pre-Requisites: None

HU1211: American Experience I - To 1865
Credits: 3.000 - This course provides students with an introduction to the basic issues and trends in American history during the period from Native American settlement through the Civil War. The course follows a chronological scheme, tracing the evolution of American ideas and attitudes about politics, economics, social class and community. Material culture, painting, music, architecture and literature are considered as expressions of American thinking and values. Pre-Requisites: None

HU1212: American Experience II - 1865 to Present
Credits: 3.000 - This course continues the study of the issues and trends introduced in HU1211, beginning with the period of Reconstruction at the end of the Civil War. Using textbook readings, primary sources and scholarly articles, as well as lectures, this course teaches students how to synthesize a variety of materials. Pre-Requisites: None

top

HU1431: History of World Art I
Credits: 3.000 - This course focuses on visual art and architecture as it reflects the development of Western civilization and some non-Western cultures, from prehistory to the European Middle Ages. Students learn visual vocabulary and explore ways in which cultural perspectives are reflected in art forms. Social, political, economic and philosophical structures are studied to provide a context for the art. Pre-Requisites: None

HU1432:  History of World Art II
Credits: 3.000 - This course focuses on visual art and architecture as it reflects the development of Western civilization and some non-Western cultures, from the time of the Renaissance to the present. As in HU1431, students learn visual vocabulary and explore ways in which cultural perspectives are reflected in art forms. Social, political, economic and philosophical structures are studied to provide a context for the art. Pre-Requisites: None




HU2011:  Western World Views
Credits: 3.000 - This course introduces students to questions relating to human nature, good and evil and ways of knowing. These topics are discussed within the framework of five world views: Christian theism, deism, naturalism, nihilism and existentialism. Fiction, non-fiction and poetry are studied as vehicles to understanding the various perspectives, and students are encouraged to begin formulating their own world views. Pre-Requisites: HU1011 or  HU1012 or  HU1211 or  HU1212 or  HU1431 or  HU1432 or  HU1031 or  HU Core Trans and EN1021 or  EN1015 and  FY1011 or  FY1001

HU2021: Ethics

Credits: 3.000 - This course introduces students to philosophical thinking in a concrete, everyday context.  By studying both classical and contemporary philosophical and literary texts, students become familiar with fundamental aspects of ethical questioning.  The course emphasizes critical thinking skills in exploring concepts such as "the good life," the individual and society, objectivity and subjectivity, happiness and suffering, free will and fate.  Students are asked to examine their own decision-making processes and develop and ethical framework for defining and addressing issues in their own lives.  Pre-Requisites: HU1011 or HU1012 or HU1211 or HU1212 or HU1431 or HU1432 and EN1021 or  EN1015 and  FY1011 or  FY1001.

HU2071: Modernism
Credits: 3.000 - Beginning at the end of the 19th century, there was a profound shift in European and American culture. The name "Modernism" has been applied to the "new" thought and art of the first half of the 20th century, which reflected recent developments in fields as diverse as industrialism, psychology and physics. This course considers both the historical circumstances that created this "modern" aesthetic, and also the impact the "modernists" continue to have on the way we see and think about the world. Pre-Requisites: HU1011 or  HU1012 or  HU1211 or  HU1212 or  HU1431 or  HU1432 or  HU1031 or  HU Core Trans and EN1021 or  EN1015 and  FY1011 or  FY1001

top

HU2211: American Studies
Credits: 3.000 - A course building on the foundation of HU1211/1212 to intensively investigate American culture. Students will use the interdisciplinary perspective of American Studies as developed over the past half century to probe more deeply into issues of race, gender, ethnicity and class, and the roles of cultural production and consumption in American life. This course also concentrates on advanced critical thinking skills such as analysis and synthesis to prepare students for upper-level undergraduate work in the humanities and related fields. Pre-Requisites: HU1011 or  HU1012 or  HU1211 or  HU1212 or  HU1431 or  HU1432 or  HU1031 or  HU Core Trans and EN1021 or  EN1011 and  FY1011 or  FY1001

HU2231: African-American Studies
Credits: 3.000 - This course offers an introduction to key themes, issues and methods in African-American studies, concentrating on black voices and perspectives. Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course investigates the African-American experience through slave narratives, essays, fiction, poetry, film, music, vernacular literature, photography and other visual arts, autobiographies, websites and field trips to historical sites. Pre-Requisites: HU1011 or  HU1012 or  HU1211 or  HU1212 or  HU1431 or  HU1432 or  HU1031 or  HU Core Trans and EN1021 or  EN1015 and  FY1011 or  FY1001

HU2321: American Romanticism
Credits: 3.000 - An introduction to the cultural history of American Romanticism as it developed in the decades before the Civil War. The course will probe sources in literature, art, religion, philosophy, and reform as we investigate movements including transcendentalism, abolitionism, women’s rights, utopianism, and temperance. Readings will include works from Emerson, Thoreau, Margaret Fuller, Frederick Douglass, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, and others. Pre-Requisites: HU1011 or  HU1012 or  HU1211 or  HU1212 or  HU1431 or  HU1432 or  HU1031 or  HU Core Trans and EN1021 or  EN1015 and  FY1011 or  FY1001

HU2341: Civil War & Reconstruction
Credits: 3.000 - This course investigates the era of the Civil War from the origins of the conflicts that led to the bloodiest war in US history to the hopes, gains, challenges and failures of Reconstruction. This is not a course in military history, though it does examine key military events and issues, but instead focuses on the political, social, and cultural history of the period. Fundamental to our investigation is the issue of freedom and the identity of the United States. We will also look at the development of myths and other accounts about the war from the "Lost Cause" to the present—that is, how the Civil War is "remembered." Pre-Requisites: HU1011 or  HU1012 or  HU1211 or  HU1212 or  HU1431 or  HU1432 or  HU1031 or  HU Core Trans and EN1021 or  EN1015 and  FY1011 or  FY1001

HU2371: The 1960s
Credits: 3.000 - This course investigates many of the significant political, social, and cultural changes in the United States in the 1960s—one of the most turbulent times in our history. We will begin with a look at the Cold War era of the 1950s and then explore the civil rights movement, the New Left, the expansion of the welfare state and the national culture, the Vietnam War, the birth of modern conservatism (the New Right), the role of religion and spiritual quests, and the making of youth culture. Pre-Requisites: HU1011 or  HU1012 or  HU1211 or  HU1212 or  HU1431 or  HU1432 or  HU1031 or  HU Core Trans and EN1021 or  EN1015 and  FY1011 or  FY1001

top

HU2381: Utopian Studies
Credits: 3.000 - This course investigates the utopian impulse in American history. We will review concepts and definitions of utopia and dystopia through the history of the Western world and their application in the United States. There have been two types of utopias: intentional communities formed to put utopian ideals into practice; and literary utopias that have served as inspirations and sometimes as blueprints of sorts. We will investigate at length an example of each kind in the larger context of utopian thought and practice. We shall also consider, in addition to utopia in America, the idea of America as utopia. Pre-Requisites: HU1011 or  HU1012 or  HU1211 or  HU1212 or  HU1431 or  HU1432 or  HU1031 or  HU Core Trans and EN1011 or  EN1015 and  FY1011 or  FY1001

HU2511: Special Topics - Environmental History
Credits: 3.000 - Human civilization has both shaped, and been shaped by, the physical environment. This course introduces students to environmental history, a field that traces the story of human interaction with the environment. Students first gain a broad overview of the major stages of world environmental history by examining historical documents, literature, visual sources, and ecological studies. Then, applying the strategies of historical research, students investigate a specific development, event, or person from an environmental perspective. Pre-Requisites: HU1011 or  HU1012 or  HU1211 or  HU1212 or  HU1431 or  HU1432 or  HU1031 or  HU Core Trans and EN1011 or  EN1015 and  FY1011 or  FY1001

HU2521: Philosophy Through Literature
Credits: 3.000 - This course examines how literature has been used to explore vital philosophical issues, such as the nature of human life and death, human relationships with the "divine", the place of humans in the natural world, and the qualities of a just society. It also considers how "Western" civilization has elevated certain philosophical issues, especially the role of logic and the notion of the "self". Readings have ranged from the plays of Sophocles to Sherlock Holmes stories, and from Japanese haiku to modern works by Hesse and Camus. Pre-Requisites: HU1011 or  HU1012 or  HU1211 or  HU1212 or  HU1431 or  HU1432 or  HU1031 or  HU Core Trans and EN1011 or  EN1015 and  FY1011 or  FY1001

HU2611: Ancient and Modern Greek Culture
Credits: 3.000 - This course, offered through Landmark's Study Abroad Program in Greece, introduces students to the origins and development of Greek culture from its Minoan roots through the flowering of Classical Greece to the world views of some modern literary figures. Among the course activities, students investigate the history and conventions of ancient Greek theatre, studying and performing a selection of works by Aeschylus and Euripides. Students will also examine the impact of classical Greek culture on modern Greece through reading the work of twentieth-century poets, historians and novelists. Pre-Requisites: HU1011 or  HU1012 or  HU1211 or  HU1212 or  HU1431 or  HU1432 or  HU1031 or  HU Core Trans and EN1011 or  FY1011 and  FY1001

HU2651: The British Experience
Credits: 3.000 - This course, offered through Landmark's Study Abroad Program in London, investigates the heritage of Great Britain and examines how that heritage has been challenged and modified by contemporary trends. Taking full advantage of access to the sights and wonders of London, this course stresses experiential learning, rather than deriving information and ideas only through readings. The architecture, art, music, drama and "civic ritual" that have become symbolic of the British heritage are experienced first-hand through frequent site visits. Through supplemental readings and class discussions students explore how these experiences relate to the theme of "tradition and change" in British civilization. Pre-Requisites: HU1011 or  HU1012 or  HU1211 or  HU1212 or  HU1431 or  HU1432 or  HU1031 or  HU Core Trans and EN1011 or  EN1015 and  FY1011 or  FY1001

HU2661: The Irish Experience
Credits: 3.000 - This course, offered through Landmark's Study Abroad Program in Ireland, investigates the main cultural traditions of Ireland, examining how the mixture of Celtic, Viking, British and European heritages in Ireland has created a range of contemporary issues regarding identity, language, religion and economic and political self-determination. Students then apply that cultural background to analyze how Irish society is meeting the challenge of modernity. Pre-Requisites: HU1011 or  HU1012 or  HU1211 or  HU1212 or  HU1431 or  HU1432 or  HU1031 or  HU Core Trans and EN1011 or  EN1015 and  FY1011 or  FY1001



Questions?

Joyce Rodgers
Chair, Humanities Department
802.387.1645
jrodgers@landmark.edu